Now I Lay Me Down

Now I Lay Me Down

All artifacts tell a story, the deathbed of General Grant in the parlor of Grant Cottage is no exception. The bed is a subject of fascination to visitors not only due to its famous occupant but the nature of the bed itself. It offers a glimpse into the sleep technology of the late Victorian era and into the final moments of a famous life.

Grant Cottage Visitor Center Exhibit Installed for 2019 Season

Grant Cottage Visitor Center Exhibit Installed for 2019 Season

A new exhibit for the Grant Cottage visitor center has been installed in time for the opening of our 2019 season.  Titled, “Grant Becomes a Cancer Patient, 1884 to 1885,” the exhibit explores the General’s final months from a medical perspective.  Using period medical equipment and related artifacts from the Trombley-Prosch collection, the story of Grant’s cancer diagnosis, treatment and diet in the final weeks of his life on Mount McGregor is interpreted

Like Mother, Like Son

Like Mother, Like Son

Like Mother, Like Son
By Ben Kemp, Cottage Operations Manager

“Of his mother he [U.S. Grant] said that she was the best woman he had ever known; unselfish, devoted to her family, thoroughly good, conscientious, intelligent, of a quiet and amiable disposition, never meddling with other persons' affairs, genuinely pious without any cant, with a strong sense of right and justice; unobtrusive, kind-hearted, and attached to her Church and country. I said, ‘General, you have most of your mother's characteristics;’ to which he simply replied, ‘Yes, I think so.’" -Michael J. Cramer (Brother-in-Law of U.S Grant)

Firmly Planted

Firmly Planted

“He [Grant] loved to ride through woods and note the different trees, and he knew them all, and speak of their growth and habits. He loved the growing grain and the means and processes of quickening it. He loved horses and farm animals, and a quiet, contemplative life mixed with the activity of outdoor work." -General E. F. Beale

From an early age, trees would have represented a resource to Ulysses Grant, a means to a livelihood….

In Spite of Myself

In Spite of Myself

By Grant Cottage Operations Manager, Ben Kemp

From an early age, Ulysses Grant had an awareness of politics. His father, Jesse, was involved in political discussions and debates during Grant’s childhood, even running for office and serving as Mayor of both Georgetown and Bethel, Ohio. Due to this, Grant would have had a natural aversion to political matters because of what it entailed. Contentious debating, public speaking, and self-promotional campaigning were distasteful to his reserved character. The only thing that would eventually serve to overcome his apprehensions was an overwhelming sense of duty.