News & Press

Discover what has been happening at the Cottage over the past season in our newsletter:



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February 2013

We make national news!

Our feature on CBS Sunday Morning this February has  generated numerous inquiries and historians seeking answers to their curiosities.  We're preparing for a potentially very busy season this year!





Spring 2013       

        TWO ROOMS RECEIVE A WALLPAPER MAKEOVER


Using written descriptions and photographs from the 1890s, the Friends worked with conservators from Peebles Islands to determine the closest matches possible to replicate the designs and colors that were present while the Grant family resided at the Cottage.  Spurred on by donations from visitors who witnessed the current damaged paper as well as significant financial and labor assistance from NYS Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation, this project has been underway during the spring of 2013.  The new wallpaper is scheduled to welcome visitors by Opening Weekend, May 2013.


Image on left is a sample of the designs for the two rooms.  The top layer is the ceiling, followed by a border design separated by a frieze, with the main wall design at the bottom.

 


VINTAGE BATH WAGON
EXHIBITED AT VISITORS CENTER

THE SARATOGIAN
Sunday May 13, 2012

WILTON — The new acquisition of an historic artifact will give Ulysses S. Grant Cottage visitors a much better understanding of the 18th president’s final days.


  Read full article






SAVING GRANT COTTAGE:
The Story of Our Youngest Advocate


As the future of Grant Cottage continues to flourish before us with more and more exciting possibilities, it is entirely appropriate to look back to the efforts of those early members whose dedication and determination have led us to this point.


This story is a recollection of a true “founding mother” and how saving Grant Cottage for future generations became a family endeavor.

Read the story
(pdf format)


OFF THE NORTHWAY
Caretakers of cottage worth studying, too

Up near the top of Mount McGregor, in the shadow of a state prison, Grant Cottage draws around 3,000 visitors a year to see the place where Ulysses S. Grant died.
   That’s not many by modern tourism standards.
   But the state historical site in Wilton where the Civil War general and former president died of cancer in 1885 was once a place of pilgrimage. In the decades after Grant died, former Civil War soldiers flocked there with their families.
   “This was a very sacred place,” said
Gazette logoSteve Trimm, a volunteer tour guide at Grant Cottage. “It would have been similar to a Vietnam veteran going to the Vietnam Memorial or to visiting Arlington. When they visited, it was to pay tribute to him, and he stood for all the veterans of the Civil War.”
   But as those old soldiers faded from the scene, visitors still came for the profoundly human story of a great but humble man dying, swindled broke and rushing to fi nish the memoir — one that turned out to be a classic — of his Army years. For nearly 100 years, caretakers lived at the cottage to greet visitors and tell the Grant story.

Read more . . .
PAST MEDIA COVERAGE